Archive Month: June 2018
Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

A 32-year-old man who attempted to steal two trays of meat from a supermarket was sentenced in Mudgee Local Court last Wednesday.
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Daniel James Burgoyne, of Horse Flat Lane, Mullamuddy, pleaded guilty to the charge of shoplifting.

At about 1.24pm on Wednesday, July 11, a staff member of Coles Mudgee saw Burgoyne put a tray of scotch fillets down the front of his pants and another under his jumper.

He then walked out of the store without paying for the items.

The police were called and they found Burgoyne sitting at the Mortimer Street taxi rank opposite the supermarket.

The meat had a value of between $50 and $60.

Burgoyne was placed on a 12-month good behaviour bond.

Coles have also banned him from entering any Coles Group property for a period of 12 months.

A 32-year-old man who attempted to steal two trays of meat from a supermarket was sentenced in Mudgee Local Court last Wednesday.

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

Creditors of the Tura Beach Tavern, Tura Beach, are poised to make a major decision about the future of the pub after it was placed into voluntary administration on Wednesday, November 14.
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The Tura Beach Tavern is owned by 27 shareholders from as far afield as Broome, Queensland, Victoria, Jindabyne and the local area.

The News Weekly understands that Nic Ellis, of 2020 Solutions is the major shareholder and it was he who called in the administrator. One shareholder is believed to have wanted his shareholding back and it was this action that prompted the appointment of the administrator, Adam Farnsworth, of Dean-Willcocks Shepard, Sydney.

A voluntary administrator may be appointed by the principals of the company, the liquidator or provisional liquidator of the company or a secured creditor whose charge covers the whole or substantially the whole of the company’s assets.

Administrator, Dean-Willcocks Shepard states that appointment of a voluntary administrator is, in the main, limited to companies which are insolvent or experiencing financial difficulty.

Mr Ellis confirmed the tavern’s poor financial situation in an email to the News Weekly, stating that “poor trading, lack of cashflow and ability to sustain losses” were behind his action in calling in the administrator

On Monday, November 26, creditors and shareholders met with Mr Farnsworth in the administrator’s office, Sydney, to discuss the situation.

Bob Brain, of Tura Beach was one of the shareholders present at the meeting. He told the News Weekly: “The Tura Beach Tavern won’t open until there has been a second creditors meeting on December 17 and a decision will be made then.

“Us creditors want to see it reopen to get some money in and take advantage of the Christmas trade. Ian Dickson, the manager said that it could easily be re-opened,” Mr Brain said.

But Mr Ellis doesn’t believe the pub will reopen and told the News Weekly that there were “no plans to reopen. It’s with the administrators”.

The clear difference of opinion by some shareholders, over the future of the pub could be the cause of some debate at the next meeting on December 17.

Following appointment, the voluntary administrator takes control of the company’s operations and assets. However it is the creditors who ultimately determine the fate of the company. The voluntary administrator must form an opinion and make a recommendation to creditors as to how the company may be able to continue trading or alternatively be wound up.

This is not the first time that the pub has been in financial strife. The pub first opened in December 2006 when it was called the Chook and Ox Tavern, but in August 2008 the last beer was poured by licencee Dave Woods who said at the time that it was too difficult to make the pub pay.

In June 2009, it was reopened after Nic Ellis and the shareholders group bought the pub.

While it appeared to be doing well, the call by a single shareholder for his money, was enough to place the pub in financial jeopardy.

Now shareholders and creditors must sit tight for a further two and a half weeks before a decision is made. But as the clock ticks by so do the opportunities to cash in on pre-Christmas drinks and business parties.

• Shareholders and creditors will decide the fate of the Tura Beach Tavern on December 17.

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

MORE than 150 community members took a stand against domestic violence on Sunday, participating in a White Ribbon Day walk across the Forster Tuncurry bridge.
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The 4km walk, which began at Tuncurry’s Memorial Park and extended over the bridge down Forster’s break wall around the lake, down the main street of Forster and back over the bridge was coordinated by the Great Lakes, Gloucester and Manning Valley domestic violence monitoring committees.

The walk held on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, marked the beginning of a 16-day of activism campaign.

Organiser Louise Webber from the Mid Coast Domestic Violence Court Advocacy Service acknowledged the attendance of participants from the local community as well as representatives from Wingham, Taree, Old Bar, Gloucester and surrounding areas.

“It is fantastic to see so many men, women and children giving their time to help us raise awareness about domestic violence in our community,” Ms Webber said.

“It is so important that we create conversation about domestic violence and encourage people to seek assistance if they are experiencing it or if they are aware that a friend, neighbour or relative is in that position. It is not okay to remain silent. One in three Australian women will be a victim of physical, psychological or sexual violence in their lifetime.”

Ms Webber thanked the community for speaking loudly on the issue by attending the walk.

“I’d like to especially thank the Forster Tuncurry Hawks Football club, the mums and dads that gave their time on the day and Great Lakes Council for supporting this event. Also to Kmart and Coles Stockland for donating water and bananas for refreshment for the participants.”

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

If you require immediate assistance where domestic violence is concerned call the Australian National Domestic Violence Hotline 1800 200 526. Trained female caseworkers provide telephone counselling, information and referrals for people who are experiencing or have experienced domestic violence. Staff are aware of the special needs of Aboriginal women and women from other cultures, as well as those living in rural and remote areas.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

TAKING A STAND: More than 150 community members marched against domestic violence at the White Ribbon Day bridge walk on Sunday. For a slideshow of photos from the walk click through the carousel.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

THE Catholic Church has served a Termination of Periodic Tenancy Without Reason on a Morisset family, which includes three children and four dogs.
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The eviction notice means Gayle Tipping and her Morisset fireman partner, Daniel, have less than 90 days to find another four-bedroom home.

But Ms Tipping says she has correspondence which indicates the reason she and her family are being “kicked out on the street” is her dogs.

“I had a lease which allowed for three dogs, but I took in a couple of foster dogs while homes were found for them because we love all animals,” she said.

“I did get rid of the extra dogs when I was asked to, though I also wrote to the church and to the real estate agent requesting consent to temporarily re-accommodate the fourth dog, George, while we found him a home.”

The early 1900s house is on part of the school grounds of St John Vianney School.

“Apparently, a parent complained that there was a risk to the children, but as anyone can see the fencing is really good and these are loving pets not savage animals,” Ms Tipping said.

“What puzzles us is we have always paid the rent, we look after the property, and we haven’t had any complaints from neighbours. It doesn’t seem very compassionate or Christian of a church to put us out on the street,” she said.

ORDERED OUT: Gayle Tipping cuddles George in the backyard of her Morisset house. Picture: David Quick

Parents had lodged complaints

BOYD McCallum, manager of strategic assets at the Diocese of Maitland-Newcastle, said it was his understanding that under the terms of a Termination of Periodic Tenancy Without Reason, neither the landlord, nor the real estate agent, is legally required to give a reason for terminating the tenancy.

The parish is considering its options for the future of the home, he said.

‘‘Of additional concern, however, has been the safety of the school children in our care at the adjoining property,’’ Mr McCallum said.

‘‘A number of concerns and complaints have been made by parents at the school regarding a dog living on the property next door.

‘‘Despite having received approval for dogs to live at the property in the past, it is my understanding that the tenant did not seek approval from the real estate agent for this dog, which is potentially more dangerous, to live on the property prior to it living there.

‘‘We certainly have empathy regarding the situation and acknowledge the tenant’s desire to provide a home for a dog, however this dog has been deemed a potential threat to the children if it escaped.’’

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

Three Cudgegong Valley Public School students have achieved perfect scores from a recent mathematics competition.
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Benson Burgoyne, Jack Tant, and Josh Jones each scored 100 per cent in the Australasian Problem Solving Mathematical Olympiads (APSMO).

The big three competed in Division J (Junior) for Year 5 and 6 students, aged from 10 to 12 years old.

It wasn’t just Benson, Jack and Josh who performed strongly for the school, CVPS’ team of 29 students finished in the top 10 per cent of the competition.

APSMO is a series of five separate contests, one per month from May until September.

Students fill out five individual contest papers each and the team score is calculated by adding up the top 10 student scores from the team.

The competition aims to introduce students to mathematical concepts and is open to schools from Australia and neighbouring countries.

BEST ON PAPER: Cudgegong Valley Public School students Benson Burgoyne, Jack Tant, and Josh Jones Jones each scored 100 per cent in the Australasian Problem Solving Mathematical Olympiads.261112/mathsgeniuses/003

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

Cessnock City Council has knocked back arequest from AGL to access a number of council road reserves for planningpotential coal seam gas exploration.
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The vote to refuse to give consent wasunanimous and council also declined to enter an access arrangement with forseismic testing on council road reserves.

Council will also re-confirm its positionabout coal seam gas activities.

While council refused the request it did resolveto get both parties together, for an information session and this would includethe Lock the Gate Alliance.

AGL have a Petroleum Exploration Licence(PEL 267) which covers parts of the Cessnock Local Government Area. As part oftheir exploration (or prospecting) activities AGL have a program of proposedseismic testing which provides information to help in their determination ofsuitable sites for further investigation.

Three of these sites are within theCessnock Local Government Area, namely Broken Back Trail and Road (withinPokolbin State Forest), Richmond Vale Road and Sheppeard Drive The test lineidentified within Pokolbin State forest is along Broken Back Road, this roaddoes not exist on a road reserve and is fully within Pokolbin State forest, therefore,council has no jurisdiction over the activity in that location.

Council has previously made resolutions inrelation to Coal Seam Gas activities within the LGA. These resolutions havefocussed on the exclusion of CSG extraction and exploration within theVineyards, Wollombi Valley and Bow Wow Creek Gorge areas of the LGA. These wereresolved during the period when the PEL was due for renewal.

The PEL 267 has been renewed and some areaswithin the LGA have been removed from

the PEL (primarily the Vineyards area), theremainder of the LGA including the Wollombi Valley and Bow Wow Creek Gorge arestill included within the PEL.

The position of Cessnock City Council inMarch 2012 was clear when it unanimously

resolved to write to Minister for Resourcesand Energy, Chris Harther “Seeking the refusal of the renewal of PetroleumExploration Licence 267 from the entire

LGA, or areas within it, including theVineyards district, the Wollombi Valley and Bow Wow Creek Gorge”.

It would be contrary to the intent of thisresolution to approve an exploration activity having sought to have no explorationin the LGA, said the report to last week’s meeting.

Cessnock Greens Councillor James Ryanwelcomed last week’s council decision to reject the application by AGL to uselocal roads to explore for coal seam gas.’This is not just about the vineyard area,” said Cr. Ryan. “The community ofCessnock overwhelmingly do not want coal seam gas exploration or production. Wedo not want our water polluted, we do not want our landscape scarred, and we donot want fugitive methane emissions leaking from the ground.””It remains to be seen whether AGL will challenge council’s decision in thecourts,” said Cr. Ryan. “However I fell confident after last week’s debate thatCessnock Council will do everything it can to prevent coal seam gas explorationand extraction in our area.”The Lock The Gate Alliance also called on council to maintain its opposition toCoal Seam Gas (CSG) exploration, ahead last week’s vote.

Hunter regional coordinator for Lock TheGate, Steve Phillips, said “Thirty-four councils in NSW have voted to opposeCoal Seam Gas in their area, including Cessnock. Councils have taken the leadwhere State and Federal Governments have failed, and have put the will of thecommunity before gas company profits.”

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

A senior resources bureaucrat has told the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) inquiry he found it “extraordinary” that a small mining company was offering millions of dollars in financial contributions to NSW on bids for coal exploration licences in the Bylong Valley.
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Kevin Fennell, who in 2008 was a probity auditor at the Department of Primary Industries, told the ICAC on Monday he was surprised how much Monaro Mining was pledging in additional financial contributions to the state on its bids for mining licences in the coal-rich area.

The ICAC has previously been told Monaro, a uranium miner with no experience in coal mining, applied for nine licences in the Bylong Valley and offered $50 million in additional financial contributions.

Those contributions included $25 million if it was awarded the critical Mt Penny tenement.

Mr Fennell said he found it extraordinary that such a large amount of money was being offered by a small mining company.

“I thought it was quite extraordinary that they made these offers to the extent that they did,” Mr Fennell said.

The inquiry has heard allegations the son of former Labor MP Eddie Obeid asked a man named Gardener Brook to find a company which could partner the Obeids in a mining venture and that Mr Brook chose Monaro Mining.

Monaro ultimately withdrew its bid for the Mt Penny tenement, with that licence going to runner up Cascade Coal after the tender process was reopened by Mr Macdonald.

The inquiry has been told Cascade subsequently paid $30 million to the Obeids.

There is no suggestion of wrongdoing on the part of Monaro, the inquiry was told.

AAP

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

Bylong Valley Protection Alliance members will take part in a peaceful protect outside the annual general meeting of Cockatoo Coal tomorrow.
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The group will join with members of the Southern Highlands Coal Action Group in the protest in Sydney.

Cockatoo Coal in conjunction with KEPCO is investigating coal mining in the Bylong Valley. The Southern Highlands group is protesting possible mining by Cockatoo in conjunction with POSCO.

Cockatoo Coal is not associated with the Mt Penny project which is at the centre the current Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) inquiry.

BVPA secretary Craig Shaw said while people now think of Bylong in terms of Mt Penny and the Obeid family, Cockatoo posed an even larger threat in terms of potential mine size and its effect on the main part of the valley.

“Cockatoo are in the middle of an extensive drilling program here and have already purchased Bylong Station and Bylong Park,” he said.

“Under threat is Tarwyn Park, renowned as the home of Peter Andrews’ “Natural Sequence Farming” method, featured in two Australian Story programs and home to Peter’s son Stuart and his family.

“As Gerry Harvey said: ‘The place should be a bloody shrine, not a hole in the ground’.

Signs protesting mining proposals in the Bylong Valley.191112/bylongpics/008

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

Twin baby lemurs born at Mogo Zoo are blissfully unaware how important they are to the future of their species.
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Black-and-white ruffed lemurs are critically endangered on their island home of Madagascar but, in Mogo, they are living the dream.

Born during the early hours of October 6, the yet to be named and sexed twins have been introduced to the public under the watchful eye of their mum, Tame.

The young are completely dependent on their mum for the first four months of their life, and Tame has already proven her mothering skills are nothing short of spectacular.

Animal operations manager Paul Whitehorn says Tame and her partner Itasi are being great parents.

“The youngsters are becoming so active and are a delight to watch,” he said.

Unfortunately, in the wild the black-and-white ruffed lemur’s future is bleak. Classified as critically endangered, the principal threat to the lemurs remaining in the wild is habitat loss due to slash-and-burn agriculture, logging and mining.

As well, they are hunted by poachers for their meat.

Endemic to the island of Madagascar, the black-and-white lemur is the only diurnal primate species to build a nest.

The twins are on display to the public daily.

To cap off a stellar month, Mogo Zoo has also taken out the Bronze award in the Tourist Attraction category of the 2012 NSW State Tourism awards held in Sydney last Thursday night.

RARE STARE: Mogo Zoo is playing a vital role in securing the future of the critically endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur. This is one of the twins born at the zoo last month.

RARE STARE: Mogo Zoo is playing a vital role in securing the future of the critically endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur. This is one of the twins born at the zoo last month.

RARE STARE: Mogo Zoo is playing a vital role in securing the future of the critically endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur. This is one of the twins born at the zoo last month.

RARE STARE: Mogo Zoo is playing a vital role in securing the future of the critically endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur. This is one of the twins born at the zoo last month.

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Jun 19 , 2018 / By :

Former Labor minister Eddie Obeid’s son told a business associate he urgently needed to finalise the purchase of property in the Bylong Valley before a NSW government decision increased its value tenfold, the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC )inquiry has heard.
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The ICAC is investigating if decisions made by former mining minister Ian Macdonald about licences in the Bylong Valley were designed to benefit political colleague Obeid, whose family owned a property in the area.

On Monday, ICAC was shown a signed statement by Arlo Selby, a former commodities trader with business ties to the Obeids, in which it was claimed Moses Obeid needed an investor to step in to fast-track the settlement of the Obeid family’s Bylong Valley property.

In the statement dated January 11, 2011, Mr Selby said Moses Obeid told him he needed an investor urgently because “when a government announcement due to come out within the next three months becomes public the value of those farms would automatically go up tenfold”.

Mr Selby said in the statement, which was tendered as evidence, that Moses indicated the deal was a “very serious coal play” and that his family owned a key property in the coal-rich area.

He claimed Moses also told him he had inside information that there were about one billion tonnes of high-grade coal in the Bylong Valley, according to the statement.

The statement also alleges that at a meeting in July 2008, Moses Obeid told former Lehman Brothers senior vice-president Gardner Brook that the outcome of the tender process for coal exploration licences in the Bylong Valley was already guaranteed because Mr Macdonald was “in on the deal”.

It also claims that Moses Obeid arranged a meeting between Mr Brook and then Labor ministers Michael Costa, Joe Tripodi and Ian Macdonald after claiming his family “had a lot of contacts within the government”.

Giving evidence, Mr Selby said only some parts of the statement were accurate and on several occasions he could not recall parts of it put to him by counsel assisting the commissioner, Geoffrey Watson.

Mr Selby said two other men, one of whom was now in prison, had been involved with him in preparing the document.

Counsel for Mr Brook put it to Mr Selby that the statement had been made in an attempt to extort money from his client.

The inquiry was told Mr Selby had fallen out with Mr Brook numerous times, including once because he had “made off with his girlfriend”.

“There was no love lost between you and Gardner Brook at the time you made this document, that’s correct?” Mr Brook’s lawyer asked.

“That would be a fair comment,” Mr Selby replied.

The inquiry has previously been told the Obeids had asked Mr Brook to find a company which could partner the Obeids in a mining venture and that Mr Brook chose Monaro Mining, a small uranium company with no experience in coal.

Monaro ultimately withdrew its bid for the Mt Penny tenement, with that licence going to runner-up Cascade Coal after the tender process was reopened by Mr Macdonald.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.